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Arizona State Prison Complex – Tucson: A Closer Look at One of the State’s Largest Correctional Facilities

Arizona State Prison Complex – Tucson (ASPC-Tucson) is one of the state’s largest correctional facilities, housing over 5,000 inmates. The prison complex is located in Tucson, Arizona, and has been in operation since 1984. ASPC-Tucson is responsible for the custody and care of adult male inmates who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from drug offenses to violent crimes.

Visiting Hours

Visiting hours typically ranged from 8 am to 4 pm. However, the exact time can vary depending on the phase the inmate is in. Inmates may go through different phases during their incarceration, which can affect their visiting privileges.

How to Stay Updated on Visiting Hours

To ensure you have the most up-to-date information on visiting hours at ASPC Tucson, you have two options:

  1. Check the Institution’s Website: The institution’s official website often provides current information on visiting hours. It’s a reliable source for the latest updates.
  2. Contact the Institution: You can also reach out to ASPC Tucson by telephone. They can provide you with the most current visiting hours and any other information you may need.

Contact Information

  • Physical Address: Arizona State Prison Complex – Tucson 10000 South Wilmot Tucson, AZ 85734
  • Telephone: (520) 574-0024

Sending Mail to Inmates

If you’d like to correspond with an inmate via mail, it’s crucial to use the correct mailing address. Different units within ASPC Tucson may have distinct addresses, so be sure to get it right.

Inmate Mailing Addresses

Here are the mailing addresses for various units at ASPC Tucson:

  • Catalina Unit: Inmate Name and ADC# P.O. Box 24409 Tucson, AZ 85734-4409
  • Cimarron Unit: Inmate Name and ADC# P.O. Box 24408 Tucson, AZ 85734-4408
  • Complex Detention: Inmate Name and ADC# P.O. Box 24403 Tucson, AZ 85734-4403
  • Manzanita Unit: Inmate Name and ADC# P.O. Box 24401 Tucson, AZ 85734-4401
  • Rincon Unit: Inmate Name and ADC# P.O. Box 24403 Tucson, AZ 85734-4403
  • Rincon Minors Unit: Inmate Name and ADC# P.O. Box 24403 Tucson, AZ 85734-4403
  • Rincon Minors Detention Unit: Inmate Name and ADC# P.O. Box 24403 Tucson, AZ 85734-4403
  • Rincon Transitory Unit: Inmate Name and ADC# P.O. Box 24403 Tucson, AZ 85734-4403
  • SACRC Unit: Inmate Name and ADC# P.O. Box 24400 Tucson, AZ 85734-4400
  • Santa Rita Unit: Inmate Name and ADC# P.O. Box 24406 Tucson, AZ 85734-4406
  • Whetstone Unit: Inmate Name and ADC# P.O. Box 24402 Tucson, AZ 85734-4402
  • Winchester Unit: Inmate Name and ADC# P.O. Box 24407 Tucson, AZ 85734-4407
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History of ASPC-Tucson

ASPC-Tucson was opened in 1984 to ease overcrowding in other state prisons. Since then, the facility has expanded and now includes several units, including the Catalina Unit, Cimarron Unit, Manzanita Unit, Rincon Unit, Santa Rita Unit, and Whetstone Unit.

The prison complex has seen its share of controversy over the years, including allegations of mistreatment of inmates, inadequate healthcare, and poor living conditions. Despite these challenges, the prison remains a vital part of Arizona’s criminal justice system.

Facilities at ASPC-Tucson

ASPC-Tucson is a large and complex correctional facility, covering over 1,300 acres. The prison complex consists of several units, each with its own specific purpose. These units include:

  • Catalina Unit: This unit is a minimum-custody facility that houses inmates in dormitory-style housing. Inmates in this unit are typically nearing the end of their sentences and are preparing to re-enter society.
  • Cimarron Unit: This unit is a medium-custody facility that houses inmates in cellblocks. Inmates in this unit have more freedom than those in maximum security, but still require a high level of supervision.
  • Manzanita Unit: This unit is a maximum-custody facility that houses inmates in cellblocks. Inmates in this unit are considered the most dangerous and require the highest level of supervision.
  • Rincon Unit: This unit is a minimum-custody facility that houses inmates in dormitory-style housing. Inmates in this unit are typically nearing the end of their sentences and are preparing to re-enter society.
  • Santa Rita Unit: This unit is a minimum-custody facility that houses inmates in dormitory-style housing. Inmates in this unit are typically nearing the end of their sentences and are preparing to re-enter society.
  • Whetstone Unit: This unit is a minimum-custody facility that houses inmates in dormitory-style housing. Inmates in this unit are typically nearing the end of their sentences and are preparing to re-enter society.
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In addition to the housing units, ASPC-Tucson also includes facilities for medical and mental health treatment, education and vocational training, recreation, and other services.

Programs Offered at ASPC-Tucson

ASPC-Tucson offers a variety of programs and services to help inmates prepare for life after prison. These programs include:

  • Education and vocational training: Inmates can participate in educational programs that help them earn high school diplomas or GEDs, as well as vocational training programs that provide job skills and certifications.
  • Substance abuse treatment: ASPC-Tucson offers a range of substance abuse treatment programs, including group therapy, individual counseling, and support groups.
  • Mental health treatment: Inmates with mental health conditions can receive treatment through ASPC Sorry about that, let me continue with the article.

Challenges Faced by ASPC-Tucson

Despite its size and scope, ASPC-Tucson faces many challenges in its day-to-day operations. Some of the challenges include:

  • Overcrowding: Like many state prisons, ASPC-Tucson is often overcrowded, which can lead to issues with safety, security, and inmate well-being.
  • Staff shortages: The prison relies on a large staff of correctional officers, medical professionals, and support staff to operate effectively. However, staffing shortages can lead to increased workload, burnout, and turnover.
  • Limited resources: Funding for prisons is often limited, which can make it difficult for ASPC-Tucson to provide adequate healthcare, education, and other services to inmates.
  • High levels of violence: Inmate-on-inmate violence and assaults on staff are a common problem in many correctional facilities, including ASPC-Tucson.

Conclusion

ASPC-Tucson is a vital part of Arizona’s criminal justice system, housing thousands of inmates and providing a range of programs and services to help them prepare for life after prison. However, the prison also faces many challenges, including overcrowding, staff shortages, and limited resources. As Arizona’s population continues to grow, it is likely that ASPC-Tucson will continue to play an important role in the state’s criminal justice system.

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FAQs

  1. How many inmates are housed at ASPC-Tucson?
  • ASPC-Tucson houses over 5,000 inmates.
  1. What types of programs are offered at ASPC-Tucson?
  • ASPC-Tucson offers a variety of programs and services, including education and vocational training, substance abuse treatment, and mental health treatment.
  1. What are some of the challenges faced by ASPC-Tucson?
  • Some of the challenges faced by ASPC-Tucson include overcrowding, staff shortages, limited resources, and high levels of violence.
  1. How long has ASPC-Tucson been in operation?
  • ASPC-Tucson has been in operation since 1984.
  1. What is the role of ASPC-Tucson in Arizona’s criminal justice system?
  • ASPC-Tucson is responsible for the custody and care of adult male inmates who are incarcerated for crimes ranging from drug offenses to violent crimes.

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